Representations of Characters from Past Life Sessions
“I feel like I made it up.”

Says almost everyone who experiences a past life after they come out of the experience. To which, I say, “yes, in a way you did.” I then explain how the intuitive part of your mind communicates to you in the same language as your imagination -through images, pictures, color, symbols and sounds including language.

And, I invite you to consider this:

  1. Out of an unlimited amount of experiences and possibilities your subconscious picked this particular story for you to see today and look how brilliantly it related to your questions. Are you telling me that you are that clever?
  2. Isn’t it true that you didn’t know what was going to happen next? That the scene unfolded and all you had to do was describe what you saw or report what felt right? Isn’t it also true that sometimes you were surprised? If you were making it up, why would you be surprised?

In a one-on-one session, you are asked to bring a series of questions you would like answered. In an Experience Past Lives workshop, one or two questions are asked. The past life that is explored is typically a story that helps answer your questions and then when the life is over, we speak to an alternate level of consciousness that has a “higher” perspective.

In a one-on-one session, the client saw a life as a pubescent indigenous girl who had been left by her tribe. She was very alone and felt abandoned. When we asked the alternate level of consciousness for the reason why she was shown that life, it was revealed that because she had not known this level of hopelessness and solitude in this lifetime, she needed to experience this because she lacked compassion for her husband who was sent to boarding school at a very young age. When before the session she would be irritated by his neediness, the life helped her have empathy.

Sometimes, the client argues with the suggestions and advice their “higher self” offered during the session while the client was in a relaxed, focused state.

Advice can include diet changes, instructions for a meditation practice,  a change in attitude and/or behavior to help with a relationship. Sometimes, these suggestions are met with shock. Tom‘s Higher self told him during one session to stop eating bread to help him lose some of the weight he had put on. Tom was shocked, “Stop eating bread?! I’m Italian. I love bread!”

Please take a moment to consider what this is like from my point-of-view.

There I am at the beginning of the session listening intently as the client shares with me her questions. Questions that are often buoyed by some level of pain or stress, rendering these questions problems she wants resolved. Then, after we explore a life, I enjoy an enlightening dialogue with the “higher self” who matter-of-factly offers a new perspective, advice and suggestions to each question. Finally, after bringing the client back to everyday level of consciousness, that is, the perspective of the personality, we review. Incredibly, more often than not, the person argues with what they just said. So again, join me at where I sit. I am watching the same face, listening to the same voice, sitting in front of the same body arguing with themselves.

What we are exploring are the many levels of consciousness who each have their point-of-view. The personality who has the questions/problems does not have the same point-of-view as the level of consciousness that answers and who has the solutions. The good news is that you already have the answers. Using Quantum Healing Hypnosis to access past life memory is just one way to help you listen to those answers even if they are not the answers you wanted to hear.

Click here to listen to Quantum Healing Hypnosis sessions including Andrea’s own session with her teacher, Dolores Cannon.

The “Explore Your Past Lives” workshop is currently being at The Elila Center for Natural Healing in Berkeley Heights and have taught in Australia and in Europe as well. Look on my calendar for the upcoming class dates and locations. If you are considering a one-on-one session, you can email me at info@andreagrace.com, or call the Elila Center: 908-271-6670. You may need to leave a message. I will return your call within 48 hours unless I am traveling.

Turkish Tea

Being Australian and having lived in Tokyo and Dublin where drinking is more like a vocation than a social past-time, comparatively, Turkey is like a teetotaling uncle who only on special occasions is seen partaking in a harder beverage.

Instead of happy hour and after dinner “meet-for-drinks”, Turkish people meet after work and fairly late into the night for çay (pronounced, “chai”). Cay is Turkish tea taken black and served with a cube or two of beet sugar. It’s made using a two-tiered kettle. The bottom half boils fresh water while the top half holds the steeping tea. Because the tea is so strong (today, I noticed the pot had 8 teabags in it) and the cups it is typically served in are Hobbit-sized, half a cup of tea is poured from the top half and then the rest of the cup is filled with the boiling water from the bottom half.

Turkish tea is drunk at all times throughout the day and served everywhere. Yesterday, I was waiting at the bookstore for the store attendant to finish helping me copy the abridged manual for the Reiki I class we had today, and the shop girl offered me tea. In a bookstore!  There I sat next to a shelf of English-Turkish and Turkish-English dictionaries sipping my tea as the after-school kids milled around shopping for pens and test kits and me watching the girl unjam the copier for the upteenth time. Outside, it’s not uncommon to see young boys weaving through the crowd and cars with tea-laden copper trays delivering çay to a local shop or business.

Tea is served at every meal. And if it’s served outside of mealtime, it’s common to nibble on some kind of sweet treat; Turkish delight, halva, a cookie, or a piece of baklava.

The other day I wondered why every night I’m still wide awake until 2am. I think the answer might be in the çay.

New Year 2013, Turkey

When I lived in Japan, come New Year, my Japanese friends would tell me that how you spend the first day of the new year is indicative of how you will spend the rest of the year. Turkish people, I learned, share the same belief. If you just spent your New Year’s day hungover and lying on the couch watching VH1 or a marathon of Hallmark movies, you probably want to reserve taking on this belief until next year ;). Somehow I adopted it and haven’t taken the time to undo it, so New Year’s day I like to do something fun and active with people I love. Last year, I went hiking in South Mountain Reservation with my Turkish friends Burçin and Hatice and Hatice’s family. It wasn’t lost on Hatice, her family, nor myself that we were together again this New Year’s day…In Turkey!
Beliefs are powerful!
So despite our late night revelries and 4am bedtime, this is what we did with the intention to carry it through the year:

  • Took a wooded walk (in a beautiful area called Sapanca)
  • Ate delicious, fresh food and drank tea and coffee
  • Spent time with people we love
  • Gave and received Reiki (we hosted a Reiki circle last night (January 1) for the local neighborhood women)

Turkey_NYsEve2013
Now, here are some things I learned about spending New Year’s Eve in Turkey:

  • Spend the evening with your family or friends
  • Give small gifts (books, CDs, clothes or cute accessories are typical)
  • Dine on roast turkey, pickled tomatoes and dolma‘s
  • Wear red knickers (that were given to you by someone else)
  • Carry a passport in your pocket (if you wish to travel in the new year)

Hatice’s mom (I love her!) blessed me with the gift of red knickers, but between all the dolma-eating, Rakı sipping and gift sharing, I didn’t get around to putting them on, so I tucked them in next to my passport and carried them with me in my little shoulder bag.

We greeted 12am coming up the escalators to Nişantaşı, a quarter of Istanbul famous for its shops and cafes. People kissed and shouted, “Happy New Year” in Turkish –I still haven’t learned it, sorry! We joined the throng and squeezed ourselves into the crowd following the music towards the heart of a street party (a DJ was playing music on an outdoor stage). A little while later, with some effort, we popped ourselves back out to walk along Abdi İpekçi Street, Turkey’s most expensive shopping street. We finished the night with Starbucks and the drive back to Izmit for our 4am bedtime.

Noted moment New Year’s Eve 2013?  Pre-dinner belly dancing lesson in the kitchen. Dear Belly Dancing, you are elusive, but I am determined to get you!
Once is enough moment New Year’s Eve 2013? Being sandwiched between revelers doing the fake-horseriding move to Gangnam Style. Why can’t I escape this song? Why?!
Noted moment New Year’s Day 2013?  The flock of starlings dancing in the sky.

Turkey_food

Food in Turkey!

Two words: Fresh and delicious.

My first meal (after a grilled spicy tuna salad sandwich at Starbucks, yes, Starbucks, while waiting for my checked suitcases that took the next flight out of my stopover destination, Zurich), was dinner at a mom-and-pop fish restaurant in Izmit. My plate was served to me with three fish complete with heads and tails, a grilled green pepper and a thick onion slice. After my initial shock from the milky eyeballs and Sophie-sized teeth gaping at me, I concentrated on peeling the meat of the fish away from the bones and was eventually adequately distracted by how good it tasted.

Breakfast is cheese (feta and a light solid cheese), olives, toast, tomato in olive oil and oregano, honey on the comb, and a yummy spread made from tahini and a thick sweet grape syrup called, tahin pekmez.

Fruit is so fresh and juicy. You can eat a lemon like an orange.

Turkey_food2

For my first dinner in Istanbul, we went to Balikci Sabahattin. We had cheese, salad, fruit, steamed eggplant, a hot pepper spread, fish and a melon that had a skin that looked like a watermelon but tasted a bit like rock melon (cantaloupe). It paired perfectly with the creamy feta cheese from the cheese plate. Fresh, light and fulfilling.

Back in Izmit…Wednesday nights are Happy Hour at the Business Complex for Tüpraş, a petroleum company and apparently the largest company in Turkey. My friend and gorgeous host, Hatice, is teaching yoga there. After yoga we went to the company’s “social building” for dinner and afterwards drinks. There I had a traditional soup called, tarhana. You can tell that eons of history has contributed to the perfection in the hearty, tangy flavour. When I finished, I felt like I had just been fed by my Turkish buiuk anne (grandmother).

My favorite thing so far?  Hatice’s homemade lentil soup.
My good-to-have-once-but-let’s-not-do-that-again? Street-vendor grilled corn on the cob.

Turkey_Xmas

I didn’t expect to find Christmas trees and Santa Claus in Turkey.

Apparently, over 95% of Turkish people are Muslim, so even though I was visiting over Christmas I didn’t expect to find Christmas here. But reality never goes in the way you expect. I found it. While there are no nativity scenes, twinkling christmas trees decorate windows, snow flakes hang from rafters and red and white reindeer look over presents. Santa Claus also can be found standing at attention in doorways and dangling perilously from balconies.

Christmas in Turkey?

Not really. It turns out that Christmas Trees, carefully wrapped presents and Santa Claus are symbols of New Year. Christmas trees are called, “New Year trees” and the gifts it nurtures are called, “New Year presents.” The red suited Santa Claus is a symbol for St Nicholas, a celebrated gift-giving saint of children born in Demre, Turkey in 270. The word Santa Claus comes from the Dutch Sinterklaas and is a colloquialism for St Nicholas…

Turkey_Xmas2

So despite the Christmas-y decorations, Christmas is a total non-event in Turkey. Having been brought up under Christian tradition, Christmas has meaning for me. So I loved how my friends created a gathering Christmas eve at home by the fire to help me feel welcome and warm and to distract me from being away from my own family in Australia and my Boston Terrier Sophie in New Jersey. Musician friends played traditional Turkish music and old Turkish pop songs. The “band” featured a flute called a ney, a small drum called a goblet drum, a guitar player and the most mesmerizing singer. After trusting me too generously to play a rhythm with the pre-school-sized maraccas, I continued to prove my rhythmlessness with a belly dancing lesson I’d been asking for! We drank wine and Rakı and nibbled cheese, nuts, dates, fruit and cake.

Christmas day coincided with my friend’s son’s 14th birthday. His wish was to have Doner for dinner and to go bowling. So my 2012 Christmas Day night was spent in a Turkish arcade in Izmit bowling to Gangnam Style, and playing foosball.
Surreal but perfect.

Andrea with Hatice Bese

Wherever I go, there I am.

After 12-hours of sitting in a seat, hurtling at however many miles an hour above the clouds through the sky, here I am. As if I never left. Nothing is really different, is it? A floor to stand on, a chair to sit in, a ceiling above my head, people around me, conversation, food and sleep.

The plane lands. My body goes from sitting to standing. And still there is the ground beneath my feet, a ceiling above my head, people around me, friends to greet me, conversation and food, and a Starbucks chair to sit in.

I am here in Turkey.